Solid quarter sawn white oak. Intrinsically durable. Beautifully unique.

Your guide to solid quarter sawn white oak furniture

Strong and true: the solidness of quarter sawn white oak looks equally beautiful on a Mission style dining table with bench or Arts & Craft style round pedestal dining table as it does on a farmhouse style dining table. With its intrinsic durability and unique open grain pattern, it is the perfect solid wood choice for an active family, busy work place or a dining room centerpiece.

Description of quarter sawn white oak

With a straight cut the white oak grain pattern is straight with a coarse, uneven texture. Adding the quarter turn cut to the white oak reveals a wonderfully different and stunningly unique grain pattern. Similar to a tigers stripes, quarter sawn white oak sections will display the beautiful ray fleck patterns that are hidden in a straight cut. The longer rays also gives white oak more figure* than other species of oak.  

While the heartwood of white oak is a light to medium brown, the sapwood is nearly white to a light brown and is not always easily delineated from the heartwood. When left with a natural finish, white oak can sometimes appear to have a very slight olive cast to it that tends to disappear with age.

Rated as a very durable hardwood, it remains one of the easiest to work with of the hardest hardwoods. This makes white oak an exceptional value and a true favorite or both woodworkers and customers alike.

*In wood, figure refers to the appearance of wood, as seen on a longitudinal surface (side-grain): a "figured wood" is not plain. The figure of a particular piece of wood is, in part, due to its grain and, in part, due to the cut, or to innate properties of the wood. Figure (wood), Wikipedia

Quarter sawn white oak grain

Quarter Sawn White Oak Grain Closeup by Home and Timber   Quarter Sawn White Oak Detail by Home and Timber

History of quarter sawn white oak

Commonly found growing through the eastern part of the United States, the white oak classification is actually made up of several different species of trees. Preferring rich and well drained soil, white oak trees will reach an average height of 60 to 80 feet.

Being naturally resistant to liquids and extremely rot resistant, white oak has been used extensively for ship building and the construction of barrels and casks.  

White oak is the state tree of Connecticut, Illinois and Maryland. Connecticut’s state quarter was minted in 1999 and features its famous white oak tree, The Charter Oak.

The Charter Oak got its name is 1687 when Captain Joseph Wadsworth saved the Connecticut Charter from the British by hiding the original Charter in the oak tree after a British representative for King James II challenged Connecticut's government.

In 1856 The Charter Oak tree fell during a violent storm. The oak was then crafted into a number of chairs that are still on display in the Hartford capitol building.

Quarter sawn white oak finishes

 

Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Natural Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Harvest Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Golden Pecan Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Vintage Antique Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Michael's Cherry Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Almond Finish on Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Earthtone Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Tavern Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Golden Brown Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Burnt Umber Finish | Stain Samples | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Briar Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Limed Oak Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber    Quarter Sawn White Oak with a Driftwood Finish | Stain Sample | Home and Timber

Order Quarter Sawn White Oak Stain Samples

Janka Hardness Scale

The Janka Hardness Scale measures the relative hardness of a wood species. The higher the number, the harder the wood species. This test measures the force required to push a .444” steel ball halfway into the wood. The Janka hardness scale is one of the best measures of a wood species ability to naturally resist denting and wear. In addition, all of Home and Timber’s solid wood furniture is finished with a Catalyzed Varnish adding an additional layer of protection.

Janka Rating

 Wood Species

660 Douglas Fir
860 American Red Elm
950 American Cherry
1010 Black Walnut
1360 Quarter Sawn White Oak
1450 Sugar Maple 
1820 Hickory

Janka Hardness Scale for Cherry and Rustic Cherry by Home and Timber

Quarter sawn white oak furniture examples

 

Beaumont Trestle Table in Quarter Sawn White Oak Detail by Home and Timber   Harvest Leg Table in Quarter Sawn White Oak Detail by Home and Timber    Mason Single Pedestal in Quarter Sawn White Oak Detail by Home and Timber

Arts and Crafts Expandable Dining Bench in Quarter Sawn White Oak Detail by Home anmber   Beaumont Expandable Dining Bench in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Denver Expandable Dining Bench in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber

Houghton Dining Chair in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Kodiak Dining Chair in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Laurie Dining Chair in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber

Artesa Sideboard in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Albany Hutch in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Colbran Frontier Island in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber

Whitaker Home Bed in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Jacobson Storage Unit in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber    Whitaker Home Chest in Quarter Sawn White Oak by Home and Timber

 

Quarter Sawn White Oak Furniture Guide by Home and Timber

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